Bonn/Eschborn: Assessing Economic Empowerment of Women in Private Sector Promotion – Best practices, instruments and success stories

Documentation of the Event:

The session presented the findings from two recent studies of the Sector Project Private Sector Development: 1. The results of an in-depth case study involving seven development interventions implemented in eight countries that have been analysed in 2015 as examples of good practice (approaches and instruments) relating to women’s participation in the private sector and 2. the findings from a study developing and piloting a qualitative Rapid Assessment tool to identify how and why household level changes have taken place for selected women in indicator categories beyond income and jobs like mobility, self-confidence, violence).

The presentations triggered a lively discussion both in Eschborn and Bonn on the need for better collection of disaggregate data, the need to mainstream the programme indicators from the start and not only at the monitoring/results level as do most Gender Marker 1 projects and recognized the need for collecting qualitative data to inform programming as quantitative data is often reality blind and household level data is needed to see what results an intervention can have on household level. Projects targeted at women (Gender Marker 2) were regarded as necessary to develop and test tools that should then be mainstreamed into other PSD projects.

Please access the following presentations of the event here:

———————————————————————–

When: Tuesday 8 March 2016/Wednesday 9 March 2016

Where: Eschborn/Bonn

With: Stefanie Springorum, Sector Project Private Sector Development, Division Economic & Social Development, GloBE  

Dr. Brigitte Späth, Senior-Fachplanerin, 4B00 Wirtschaft, Beschäftigung und Soziales

Emilie Gettliffe, Associate Consultant, MarketShare Associates

Nele Wolfshohl-Wasmuth, Programmleiterin EconoWin, GIZ

What: Over the years, the issue of gender equality in projects and programmes has been subject to change, as have the strategies, approaches and instruments used to promote the private sector. The result is a wide range of approaches and instruments that can be used at different levels of intervention to empower women economically. Women’s economic empowerment (WEE) is increasingly becoming a priority area of economic development programming, pushed forward by the German G7 Initiative on Women’s Economic Empowerment (2015) and as a focus area of BMZ’s Gender Equality Strategy (2014). Subsequently, practitioners are gaining more experience in effectively monitoring and assessing impacts, outcomes and outputs, but there is still much to be done. The speakers in this session will share findings from two recent studies of the Sector Project Private Sector Development to illustrate this and discuss implications for future programming.

The session will present:

  • The results of an in-depth case study involving seven development interventions implemented in eight countries that have been analysed in 2015 as examples of good practice (approaches and instruments) relating to women’s participation in the private sector. This embraces a wide range of development approaches and measures at various levels implemented by German technical cooperation to achieve the economic empowerment of women. We will discuss their potential for replication and scaling up.
  • Findings from a study developing and piloting a qualitative Rapid Assessment tool, one of several tools that is needed for integrating household level indicators of WEE into results measurement systems. A Rapid Assessment is used to identify how and why household level changes have taken place for selected women. It can be applied at various stages to see what is working. It can also help to develop detailed success stories, e.g. with a view to demonstrate the potential impact of having a job or additional income on the living conditions of women at a household level including impact categories such as mobility, decision making, violence, etc. It has been tested in the MENA region as well as Rwanda and Kosovo so far.
  • In addition, there is scope to discuss how cooperation with the private sector can help to empower women economically.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.